6 November 2012: DisasterAssistance.gov

6 November 2012: DisasterAssistance.gov

RE: Marshall Zamor Grand Jury Release

Christopher S. Porrino, Attorney General

Division of Criminal Justice
Elie Honig, Director

DRAFT

For Immediate Release: 
December , 2017

For Further Information Contact:
Peter Aseltine (609) 292-4791

STATE GRAND JURY DECLINES TO RETURN INDICTMENT IN CONNECTION WITH IN-CUSTODY DEATH OF MAN ARRESTED BY STATE POLICE ON AC EXPRESSWAY

TRENTON – A state grand jury declined to file any criminal charges at the conclusion of its deliberations regarding the death of Marshall Zamor, 39, of Sicklerville, N.J., who died while in the custody of the New Jersey State Police after being arrested on a drug charge on the Atlantic City Expressway on March 29, 2017.

Because the death occurred after Zamor was arrested and while he was in police custody, it was investigated by the Attorney General’s Shooting Response Team under the Attorney General’s Directive on Police-Use-of-Force Investigations. The Shooting Response Team is made up of investigators from the Division of Criminal Justice and the New Jersey State Police Homicide Unit. After hearing testimony and evidence from the team’s investigation, the state grand jury concluded its deliberations on Dec. 14 and declined to indict any of the law enforcement officers involved in the fatal incident.

With regard to the specific factual circumstances of the incident, the investigation revealed that Zamor was stopped on the Atlantic City Expressway at approximately 10:52 a.m. on March 29 because the windows of his vehicle had illegal tinting. The trooper smelled marijuana and requested backup. Zamor was repeatedly ordered out of his car, and after refusing to obey the orders for several minutes, exited the vehicle and was arrested. The trooper walked Zamor to the rear of his car, handcuffed his hands behind his back, and searched him, but no force was used by the trooper. A probable cause search of the car revealed two suspected marijuana “blunts,” which later tested positive. Zamor was brought to the Atlantic City Expressway State Police Station, where he was placed in a holding cell pending processing on the charge of possession of marijuana. Video footage from the police vehicle revealed that Zamor was chewing on something while he was being handcuffed and as he was transported in the troop car to the station. At one point, a small white object could be seen inside Zamor’s mouth, and at another point, he leaned forward and left a streak of saliva on the partition in the vehicle, which later tested positive for cocaine.

Zamor was placed in a holding cell at the station at 11:34 a.m. Before he was placed in the cell, the trooper who arrested him searched him again, removing a hooded sweatshirt and a belt he was wearing. After about five minutes, troopers observed that Zamor was using a smart watch and had a large bulge in his cheek. Two troopers entered the cell, where they took the watch and ordered Zamor to open his mouth so they could retrieve the object. Zamor did not cooperate. The troopers tried unsuccessfully to force Zamor to open his mouth so they could remove the object. Three other troopers entered the cell to help hold Zamor against a wall, but the efforts to clear his mouth failed and the troopers left the cell.

While the troopers were forceful in holding Zamor, no punches, strikes or kicks were used against him.

Zamor sat down on the bench in the cell after the troopers left. He continued to act like there was something in his mouth. At approximately 11:46 a.m., the five troopers re-entered the cell, with two

wearing latex gloves. One trooper ordered Zamor to open his mouth and spit out whatever was inside. Zamor did not comply, so the troopers held Zamor while one of the gloved troopers forced Zamor’s mouth open and was able to recover some pieces of suspected crack cocaine, which later tested positive. Additional pieces remained in Zamor’s mouth, and the second trooper wearing gloves tried unsuccessfully to remove those. All five troopers left the cell after a few minutes, and Zamor sat down on the bench. Again, no force was used by the troopers during these efforts beyond the force needed to hold him and try to swipe the object from his mouth. Zamor did not appear to be in distress during or after these attempts.

Zamor continued to work his mouth and wipe his mouth as if he had something in it. After a number of minutes, he began to appear restless and uncomfortable, repeatedly leaning over a sink in the cell, where he drank water and wiped his face, his clothing and the sink with toilet paper. At one point, he put a wad of toilet paper in his mouth. At approximately 12 noon, troopers called for EMS to respond, reporting that a prisoner had ingested suspected crack cocaine. At that same time, troopers again entered the cell. Zamor was continuing to chew on something and he got up and returned to the sink.

The troopers told Zamor to spit out what was in his mouth and one trooper tried to remove the objects, but Zamor continued to resist, shaking his head. Six troopers were in the cell at this time. Two troopers held Zamor against a back wall while the trooper tried to remove what was in Zamor’s mouth, and they then brought Zamor to the floor of the cell.

Zamor continued to struggle with the troopers after he was placed on the ground, and the troopers handcuffed his hands behind his back and held him down. At approximately 12:04 p.m., Zamor’s body began convulsing. The troopers rolled Zamor on his side and moved his head away from the wall during the convulsions. At 12:05 p.m., the State Police made a follow-up call to expedite the response by emergency medical personnel. After Zamor stopped convulsing, Troopers can be seen in video footage administering ammonia packs, commonly called “smelling salts,” in an effort to revive Zamor, who apparently was unconscious. The handcuffs were removed and Zamor was placed on his back. An unsuccessful attempt was made to revive Zamor with a defibrillator, and at approximately 12:09 p.m., two troopers commenced CPR compressions and breathing. They continued CPR until emergency medical personnel arrived and took over. Zamor was taken to AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center in Pomona, where he was pronounced dead at 1:13 p.m.

During the autopsy, a plastic bag was found obstructing Zamor’s larynx and a piece of suspected crack cocaine was found in his trachea. The plastic bag and suspected cocaine later tested positive.

Toxicology tests revealed cocaine and a cocaine metabolite in Zamor’s blood and urine, as well as THC. There was no evidence of recent significant injuries on Zamor’s body. The Medical Examiner’s Office concluded that Zamor’s death was caused by cocaine intoxication and listed the airway obstruction as a contributory factor. The manner of death was ruled accidental.

After considering the facts, evidence and testimony from the investigation by the Attorney General’s Shooting Response Team, the state grand jury declined to return an indictment.

Under an Attorney General Directive issued in 2006 and strengthened in 2015, the Attorney General’s Shooting Response Team is dispatched to handle investigations of incidents in which a state- or county- level officer uses deadly force or there is an in-custody death involving such officers. The directive establishes strict procedures for conducting these investigations. The Shooting Response Team is made up of deputy attorneys general and detectives of the Division of Criminal Justice, as well as detectives of the State Police Homicide Unit, all of whom operate independently of their usual chain of command and report directly to the Director of the Division of Criminal Justice or a designee. All portions of the Attorney General’s Directive on Police-Use-of-Force Investigations were complied with in this case.

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RE: Marshall Zamor Grand Jury Release

7 July 2012: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Introduces Recorded Memorial Tribute Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 29, 2012

MEDIA CONTACTS
Steve Groeninger
steve@nleomf.org | (202) 737-7135

National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Introduces Recorded Memorial Tribute Program

Program allows citizens to honor fallen law enforcement officers by funding the creation of recorded tributes

Washington, DC The National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund has launched a new Recorded Memorial Tribute Program, designed to share the stories of law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty. The program provides a special way for all citizens to honor those who have made the ultimate sacrifice. In fact, it encapsulates a well-known quote inscribed on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DCs Judiciary Square, It is not how these officers died that made them heroes, it is how they lived.

Each Recorded Memorial Tribute, approximately five minutes long, is created by a team of professional recording engineers, researchers, script writers, and voice actors, and will include photographs by Pulitzer Prize winner David H. Kennerly. Additionally, each donor will be recognized at the end of every Tribute. The Tributes contain many defining accomplishments and memorable quotes about an officerbringing to life each captivating story. Once finished, these Tributes will be housed in the National Law Enforcement Museum, accessible to Museum visitors online and in person when the Museums doors open in 2014. There, visitors will gain a greater understanding of the lives lived and sacrifices made by Americas fallen heroes.

We are thrilled to offer this special opportunity to people across the country to help us document the lives of Americas peace officers in such a unique and lasting way, said National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Chairman & CEO Craig W. Floyd. Never before have Americans had the chance to ensure that stories about a loved one, colleague, neighbor or friend will be preserved for generations and shared with visitors of the National Law Enforcement Museum.

The Recorded Memorial Tribute Program is not exclusive; all Americansindividuals, businesses, civic groups, and veterans organizationsare encouraged to get involved in helping create these beautiful Tributes to commemorate the service and sacrifice of our nations law enforcement officers. Citizens can either fund an entire Tribute or donate to support the Recorded Memorial Tribute Program.

The Recorded Memorial Tribute Program gives grateful communities, businesses, law enforcement agencies and individual citizens an opportunity to express their appreciation for our officers by supporting an initiative that produces lasting tributes in their honor, Mr. Floyd said. What better way to honor Americas fallen officers than to help guarantee their individual stories are told in the nations museum about law enforcement?

To learn more about the Recorded Memorial Tribute Program, visit www.recordedmemorialtribute.com.

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About the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund

Established in 1984, the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund is a private nonprofit organization dedicated to honoring the service and sacrifice of America’s law enforcement officers and to promoting officer safety. The Memorial Fund maintains the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC, which contains the names of 19,660 officers who have died in the line of duty throughout U.S. history. The Memorial Fund is now working to create the National Law Enforcement Museum, which will tell the story of law enforcement through high-tech, interactive exhibitions, historical artifacts and extensive educational programming.

7 July 2012: National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund Introduces Recorded Memorial Tribute Program

25 February 2015: STFA’s Statement on Governor Christie’s Budget

State Troopers Fraternal Association of New Jersey

State Troopers Fraternal Association of New Jersey, Inc.
Statement on Governor Christie Budget
For Immediate Release
February 25, 2015

Media Contact:

Christopher Burgos, President

State Troopers Fraternal Association of NJ, Inc. cburgos@stfa.org

The State Troopers Fraternal Association has had NO conversations nor has any State Police Association agreed to the Governor’s Budget proposal. There has been NO correspondence from the Governor’ s Office referring to suggested changes or proposals for our pension system. The STFA vehemently objects to any kind of pension “freeze” or inferior cafeteria style health care. Every member of the State Police have kept up on our end of “Chapter 78”.

We will review the Commission Report that was kept secret and held from us until after yesterday’s budget address.

We urge the Governor to follow the Court order from the Superior Court, due to the Administration’s willfully breaking the law the Governor signed, no different than any other laws that we as sworn law enforcement officers take an oath to abide by and enforce.

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STFA 2634 HIGHWAY 70 MANASQUAN NJ 08736 732-528-6388 FAX/732-223-4947

Web: www.stfa.org email: info@stfa.org
25 February 2015: STFA’s Statement on Governor Christie’s Budget

May 4, 2009: Petition for President Obama Extradite JoAnne Chesimard before signing relations with Cuba

May 4, 2009: Petition for President Obama Extradite JoAnne Chesimard before signing relations with Cuba